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LEHDER News

Multi-Sector Air Pollutant Regulations - Part 1 Questions & Answers Document & Webinar Details Released

     Posted by LEHDER News on

MSAPR Part 1 - Questions & Answers Document and WebinarPart 1 - Boilers and Heaters of the Multi-Sector Air Pollutant Regulations establishes the requirements for the emission of NOx from boilers and heaters in certain regulated facilities in various industrial sectors.  Based upon inquiries received through the Electricity and Combustion Division of Environment and Climate Change Canada, a Question & Answer document has been released in regards to Part 1 of the MSAPR.  In addition, webinars will be held to cover this document but attendees must be registered to participate. 

Webinar Details

Three sessions will be held, two in English and one in French:

 Date  Time (2 hours)
 Language
 November 29
13:00 (EST)
 English
 December 1
13:00 (EST)  English
 December 2
13:00 (EST)  French

 Registration Details

To register, please submit an email by November 28th to ec.combustion.ec@canada.ca

Information to include in the email:

  • which session you would like to attend,
  • your organization, and
  • the number of participants.

The information to participate to the webinar will be forwarded in a subsequent email.  

MSAPR Part 1 - Questions & Answers

The Q&A documents in regards to Part 1 are provided for you below:

MSAPR Part 1 - Questions & Answers (English) MSAPR Part 1 - Questions & Answers (English) (764 KB)

Partie I RMSPA - Questions & Réponses (French) Partie I RMSPA - Questions & Réponses (French) (787 KB)

For more information in regards to the MSAPR, please contact Marnie Freer.

LEHDER Series, Part III – Federal and Ontario SO2 Changes – How Can You Prepare?

     Posted by LEHDER News on

LEHDER SO2 CAAQS Blog Series Part IIIParts I and II of the LEHDER Blog Series on the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) for sulphur dioxide have discussed the background and delineation of air zones in Ontario.  Part III discusses what industries can to do prepare for these changes.  The CCME states “it will be up to provinces and territories to delineate and manage their air zones based on local circumstances”.  Ontario has delineated air zones however, we still await information about how they intend to manage air zones in Ontario particularly with respect to SO2. Without clear direction from the province yet, it is difficult to prepare for these coming changes with any amount of certainty. 

What We Know

  • The O. Reg. 419/05 modeling and statistical evaluation for compliance with Ontario Standards and Guidelines is significantly different than that applied in other jurisdictions including British Columbia, Metro Vancouver, and the USEPA. 
  • CCME CAAQS for SO2 are not expected to be direct comparators for modelled concentrations of facility SO2 emissions.  
  • The MOECC intends to post a Notice of Proposal to the EBR to change (lower) the air standards for SO2 in Ontario.  This notice will likely be accompanied by a scientific rationale document. 

How You Can Prepare

Every facility is unique in their management of SO2 emissions, and so will your preparations for change.  Some preparation activities that may be helpful include:

  • Examine the basis of the SO2 maximum operating scenario in your Emission Summary and Dispersion Modelling Report and evaluate opportunities for refinement.
  • Understand the SO2 ambient (background) air concentrations in your air zone and how that value may compare to your individual facility concentrations using O.Reg. 419/05.
  • Evaluate your point of impingement (POI) concentrations using various different statistical techniques used in other jurisdictions to understand sensitivity and variability.
  • Understand the basis of operating scenarios used in other jurisdictions. 


LEHDER Series Part I - What Do the CCME SO2 CAAQS Mean for Industry? - available here.

LEHDER Series Part II - Summary of Ontario Air Zones - available here.


Helpful Links

CCME Announces New SO2 Ambient Air Quality Standards
LEHDER Blog Post, November 1, 2016

EBR Decision - Delineation of Ontario Air Zones
https://www.ebr.gov.on.ca/ERS-WEB-External/displaynoticecontent.do?noticeId=MTI1MjE2&statusId=MTkzMDMw

MOECC Pre-Consultation Notice for Updating Air Standards for SO2 (EBR # 012-7192)
https://www.ebr.gov.on.ca/ERS-WEB-External/displaynoticecontent.do?noticeId=MTI4MTY2&statusId=MTkzNzI5&language=en

MOECC Presentation - Air Zones in Ontario (PDF Download)
https://cleanairpartnership.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/20160401-azd-gtacac.pdf

Map of Ontario Air Zones (PDF Download)
http://www.downloads.ene.gov.on.ca/envision/env_reg/er/documents/2015/012-4347.pdf


LEHDER has over 20 years of experience in Air Quality Consulting.  For more information on the SO2 CAAQS or Ontario Air Zones, please contact Penny McInnis

LEHDER Series, Part II – AQMS Summary of Ontario Air Zones

     Posted by LEHDER News on

LEHDER Series, Part II SO2 CAAQSIn March 2016, Ontario committed to implementing the CCME Air Quality Management System (AQMS) as stated in the MOECC policy decision (EBR #012-4347).  The implementation of the Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) for SO2 supports this initiative - please review Part I of the LEHDER Blog Series here for additional background.  As a first step to the implementation of the AQMS in Ontario, the province has delineated air zones, referred to as Air Zones 1 through 3.  

Ontario Air Zone Details

 Air Zone
Description
Geographic Area
 Air  Zone 1

Areas with limited pollution from either point or non-point sources or transboundary influence; where air quality management activities are focused on maintaining good air quality.

Majority of Northern Ontario
Air Zone 2
Areas under pressure from multiple sources including some or all of the following: non-point sources, smaller point sources, individual large industrial point sources, transboundary influences; where air quality management activities are focused on multiple broad-based initiatives targeting many sources. Majority of Southern Ontario, Sault. Ste. Marie and the City of Greater Sudbury
 Air Zone 3
Areas with a concentration of large industrial sources; where air quality management activities are focused on the abatement of local industrial emissions as well as non-industrial sources. City of Hamilton, Sarnia-Area (including the city of Sarnia and Township of St. Clair)

You can download a map of these zones via http://www.downloads.ene.gov.on.ca/envision/env_reg/er/documents/2015/012-4347.pdf

Concerns were raised during the proposal comment period in regards to the lack of supporting information and details about how the air zones will be used to drive Ontario’s proposed approach to air zone management (AZM).  The MOECC responded in March of 2016 that the approach to managing air zones in Ontario is currently being developed and that the approach will include and build on all laws, regulations and policies currently in place, and involve partnerships with local governments, stakeholders and communities. To date, no further information has been publicly provided on what this approach looks like.  

The Environmental Bill of Rights (EBR) decision states that the key concept of the Ontario AZM is that as air quality approaches or exceeds the CAAQS, Ontario will implement progressively more proactive measures, tools and activities to improve air quality.  Anticipated management actions and strategies in Zone 3 may include:

  • A Local Integrated Air Strategy
  • Community specific action plan
  • Frequent, proactive inspection of facilities

SO2 and Ontario Air Zones

Although Ontario has not proposed any specific values for updated SO2 air standards, pre-consultation began in April & May of 2016 with a Science Discussion Document. No further information has been posted, but LEHDER continuously monitors the EBR and will share any new information as it becomes available.


LEHDER Series Part I - What Do the CCME SO2 CAAQS Mean for Industry? - available here.


Helpful Links

CCME Announces New SO2 Ambient Air Quality Standards
LEHDER Blog Post, November 1, 2016

EBR Decision - Delineation of Ontario Air Zones
https://www.ebr.gov.on.ca/ERS-WEB-External/displaynoticecontent.do?noticeId=MTI1MjE2&statusId=MTkzMDMw

MOECC Pre-Consultation Notice for Updating Air Standards for SO2 (EBR # 012-7192)
https://www.ebr.gov.on.ca/ERS-WEB-External/displaynoticecontent.do?noticeId=MTI4MTY2&statusId=MTkzNzI5&language=en

MOECC Presentation - Air Zones in Ontario (PDF Download)
https://cleanairpartnership.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/20160401-azd-gtacac.pdf

Map of Ontario Air Zones (PDF Download)
http://www.downloads.ene.gov.on.ca/envision/env_reg/er/documents/2015/012-4347.pdf


LEHDER has over 20 years of experience in Air Quality Consulting.  For more information on the SO2 CAAQS or Ontario Air Zones, please contact Penny McInnis


LEHDER Series, Part I – What Do the CCME SO2 CAAQS Mean for Industry?

     Posted by LEHDER News on

CAAQS SO2 - LEHDER Series, Part 1The Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) are part of a National Air Zone Management Framework to reduce air pollution in Canada.  The Framework provides flexibility for provinces and territories to achieve optimal air quality outcomes.  The most important principle to understand in regards to the CAAQS is that CAAQS are not enforceable standards; they represent national benchmarks.   

New CAAQSs for SO2 were published on October 3, 2016 by the CCME and are shown in the table below.

 

70 ppb SO2 is equivalent to 183.4 ug/m3 and 5.0 ppb SO2 is equivalent to 13.1 ug/m3.

What We Know

  • CCME guidance related to achievement determination of CAAQS for PM2.5 and Ozone provides detailed information on how to statistically evaluate ambient monitoring data to compare to the CAAQS values.  
  • We would expect to see a similar guidance document to be issued by CCME for the new SO2 CAAQS.
  • As an air zone approaches or exceeds the CAAQS, progressively more rigorous actions can be implemented in those zones.
  • The CCME Air Zone Management Framework (AZMF) allows for some accounting of Transboundary Flow and Exceptional Events that may be non-recurrent in nature.
  • In March 2016, Ontario committed to implementing the CCME Air Quality Management System (AQMS) in the EBR policy decision #012-4347.  As a first step, the province has delineated Air Zones 1 through 3. 

Comparing individual facility SO2 emissions (and POI concentrations) in accordance with O.Reg.419/05 to the CCME CAAQS management levels for SO2 is not comparing ‘apples to apples’.

LEHDER Series Part II - Summary of Ontario Air Zones - available here.


Helpful Links

CCME Announces New SO2 Ambient Air Quality Standards
LEHDER Blog Post, November 1, 2016

New SO2 CAAQS
http://www.ccme.ca/en/resources/air/air/sulphur-dioxide.html

Guidance Document on Air Zone Management (PDF Download)
http://www.ccme.ca/files/Resources/air/aqms/pn_1481_gdazm_e.pdf

Guidance Document on Achievement Determination - Canadian Ambient Air Quality Standards for Fine Particulate Matter and Ozone (PDF Download)
http://www.ccme.ca/files/Resources/air/aqms/pn_1483_gdad_eng.pdf

MOECC Presentation - Air Zones in Ontario (PDF Download)
https://cleanairpartnership.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/20160401-azd-gtacac.pdf

EBR Decision - Delineation of Ontario Air Zones
https://www.ebr.gov.on.ca/ERS-WEB-External/displaynoticecontent.do?noticeId=MTI1MjE2&statusId=MTkzMDMw


LEHDER has over 20 years experience in air quality consulting - for more information in regards to the SO2 CAAQS or how LEHDER may assist your facility, please contact Penny McInnis.